All Posts by Management & Policy Category

Management & Policy

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What You Don’t Know About Internal Motivation May Harm Your Career

 

So you want to build a billion-dollar company, and it’s because you want to make people’s lives better by solving a problem while hitting it big, rich, and famous. Sounds like a winning combo of incentives to drive you to achieve startup success.

It’s not like both motives can’t coexist. Humans, complex beings that we are, walk around with a jumble of intentions, impulses, and aspirations in our heads — instead of one clearcut reason for why we do things.

 

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No Such Thing as a Free Lunch

Recognize This! – Lunch with “the boss” can be a rewarding experience when implemented in the right way. Pizza lunches or “dinner with the boss” are rewards we often hear about in employee recognition efforts at companies of all sizes. Frankly, after so many free lunches, any real value is lost. But much more value […]
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The 60% Rule: The Humbling Reason Why It’s Vital that You Encourage Autonomy at Work

Breakthrough products are created out of thin air by a singular product visionary — your Steve Jobsian figure in a black turtleneck and a ponderous look. He yells at people and tells them what to do, until it’s perfect and done.

To Chris Savage, co-founder and CEO of Wistia, one of the biggest video hosting sites on the web for businesses, that’s a widespread misconception that can harm the way you run your business.

Chris has a rule of thumb on making product decisions that’s both incredibly humbling to all you Jobs disciples out there and imperative to grasp. The rule is this: the very best of us only get product decisions right 60% of the time. The rest of the time, we’re wrong.

How the 60% Rule Transformed Amazon

 

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3 Tips for Recruiting Alumni Employees

Recognize This! – Sometimes, the best employee for the job is “the one that got away.” Who are the top candidates in your recruiting pool? The obvious answer is people who know your industry and business, already have deep experience in the role, and are a culture fit. Some recruiters call these candidates “Purple Squirrels” […]
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Jack be Quick Jack be Nimble

A month ago, many of us were glued to the tube watching the finals of the World Cup from Brazil. It gave us an insight into how in order to win, the players had to be quick and nimble. Every second of the game, the players had to be alert to what was happening on the field. The goalie had to forecast the moves that were required in order to meet the incoming ball to keep out of the net. The player on the field had to judge when was the right moment to kick the ball or to head it. All of these actions require one to be quick and nimble. This applies equally to the business world.

Our managers are faced with the same kind of strategic decisions that the World Cup players are confronted with. We find that as circumstances change we are required to respond quickly and nimbly to the events.  We are required to constantly respond to the demands of our clients. We need to be able to respond on a spin of a dime as the needs arise. So the challenge before management today is how do we become that quick and nimble executive that the global workforce expects and even more important demands. What do we need to do to be that agile executive?

David Steinberg, the CEO of XL Marketing, stated, ...

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Gap between Millennial Employee Viewpoints and Employer Expectations

 

For any organization to operate efficiently, there must be complete coordination between all layers of staff and management. Only when there is complete communication can you expect an organization to operate smoothly. All gaps must be bridged, and all terms must be understood well by all. When running an organization, terms, definitions as well as all targets and expectations must be crystal clear to employers and employees. However, in recent years, employers and employees seem to have drastically different views on crucial areas, which lead to much distress and turmoil for companies.

Millennials are known for having opinions that are quite different to those of their employers. Indeed, the differences are so vast that you might wonder how they could ever be reconciled. For example, 86% of Millennials see themselves as hardworking indivdiauals, while only 11% of their employers agree with this. Also, 82% of Millennials believe that they are loyal to their employers, but only 1% of employers believe that this is true.

What Can Be Done to Narrow the Perception Gap between Employers and Millennials?

 

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The Lesson From the Microsoft Cuts: Don’t Mix the Message on Layoffs

This is not good. One of the guys on the marketing team I work with just got fired. OMG, they just fired another one. It is just crazy around here now.”

As I read the text messages, I could feel the tension that must have permeated this workplace.
 
The text was from someone who had been in the world of work for four years out of college. This situation with them went on for two days, and as I got the blow-by-blow, it felt like being in a war zone.
 
The question that probably popped in her mind was, “Am I next?” When I asked that question, her response was, “I honestly don’t know, but I do know that I am backing up all my work just in case.”
 
So when the dust settled, the leaders of this company called an all-hands-on-deck meeting to talk about the new corporate strategy. Oh, they also discussed the layoffs.

Who are these people?
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What’s Your Word for Your Attitude about Your Work?

If I asked you to describe your attitude towards your work in one word, what would it be? Setting aside for a moment your feelings for work, the English language admittedly makes this difficult. German, for example, is a fascinating language in that new or changing concepts can be described by stringing words together to create a new one (e.g.,freundschaftsbezeigungen, which means “demonstrations of friendship”).

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Why You Shouldn’t Build a Billion-Dollar Startup

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Entrepreneurs dream about building the next big billion-dollar company. But the Apple, Google, and Facebook-shaped stars in their eyes end up clouding their vision. It’s easy to get caught up imagining your company going viral and getting to millions of users — all before your business has made a single dollar.

All the hopes and visions in the world won’t get you any closer to your billion-dollar exit. In fact, setting out to build a billion-dollar startup is one of the biggest mistakes you can make.

 

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When Service Is Two Chairs and a Napkin Short

A few weeks ago, we attended a gala event, and a series of service bobbles reminded me again that even when service people are perfectly nice, the service itself might still be inadequate.

How much does a customer’s response to service results from the communication between humans? And how much of it is caused by the service person’s lack of judgment, discretion, training, procedure, or supervision?